2022 World Rally Championship

50th running of the World Rally Championship
2022 FIA World Rally Championship
World Drivers' Champion:
Kalle Rovanperä
World Co-drivers' Champion:
Jonne Halttunen
Previous
2021
Next
2023
Support series:
FIA World Rally Championship-2
FIA World Rally Championship-3
Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT (GR Yaris Rally1 pictured) are the current manufacturers' championship leader.

The 2022 FIA World Rally Championship is the fiftieth season of the World Rally Championship, an auto racing competition recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) as the highest class of international rallying. Teams and crews compete for the World Rally Championships for Drivers, Co-drivers, Manufacturers and Teams. Crews are free to compete in cars complying with Groups Rally1 to Rally5 regulations; however, only manufacturers competing with Rally1 cars homologated under radically new regulations are eligible to score points in the manufacturers' championship. The championship began in January 2022 with the Rallye Monte-Carlo and is expected to conclude in November 2022 with Rally Japan. The series is supported by the World Rally Championship-2 and World Rally Championship-3 classes at every round of the championship with the junior category at selected events.

Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia are the reigning drivers' and co-drivers' champions, having secured their eighth championship titles at the 2021 Rally Monza. However, Ingrassia would not defend his title as he retired from competition at the end of 2021 season. Toyota are the defending manufacturers' champions.

With two rounds to go, Kalle Rovanperä and Jonne Halttunen respectively lead the drivers' and co-drivers' championships by sixty-four points over Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja. Thierry Neuville and Martijn Wydaeghe are third, a further twenty-nine points behind. In the manufacturers' championship, reigning manufacturer champion Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT holds an eighty-one-point lead over Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT, with M-Sport Ford WRT in third.

Rovanperä and Halttunen won their first World Rally Championship after winning the 2022 Rally New Zealand. At the age of twenty two, Rovanperä became the youngest World Rally Champion.

Calendar

The 2022 season is scheduled to be contested over thirteen rounds that across Europe, Africa, Oceania and Asia.

Round Start date Finish date Rally Rally headquarters Surface Stages Distance Ref.
1 20 January 23 January Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo Monte Carlo, Monaco Mixed[a] 17 296.03 km [1]
2 24 February 27 February Sweden Rally Sweden Umeå, Västerbotten County Snow 17 264.81 km [2]
3 21 April 24 April Croatia Croatia Rally Zagreb Tarmac 20 291.84 km [3]
4 19 May 22 May Portugal Rally de Portugal Matosinhos, Porto Gravel 21 338.34 km [4]
5 2 June 5 June Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Alghero, Sardinia Gravel 21 307.91 km [5]
6 23 June 26 June Kenya Safari Rally Kenya Nairobi Gravel 19 363.44 km [6]
7 14 July 17 July Estonia Rally Estonia Tartu, Tartu County Gravel 24 314.26 km [7]
8 4 August 7 August Finland Rally Finland Jyväskylä, Central Finland Gravel 22 322.61 km [8]
9 18 August 21 August Belgium Ypres Rally Belgium Ypres, West Flanders Tarmac 20 281.58 km [9]
10 8 September 11 September Greece Acropolis Rally Greece Lamia, Central Greece Gravel 16 303.30 km [10]
11 29 September 2 October New Zealand Rally New Zealand Auckland, North Island Gravel 17 279.80 km [11]
12 20 October 23 October Spain RACC Rally Catalunya de España Salou, Catalonia Tarmac 19 293.77 km [12]
13 10 November 13 November Japan Rally Japan Nagoya, Chūbu Region Tarmac 19 283.27 km [13]
Sources:[14][15][16]
2022 World Rally Championship is located in Earth
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
2022 World Rally Championship
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2022 World Rally Championship
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A map showing the locations of the rallies in the 2022 championship. Event headquarters are marked with black dots.

Location changes

  • The headquarters of the Monte Carlo Rally moved from Gap, Hautes-Alpes to Monaco alone. The rally was previously based solely in Monaco in 2006.[17]
  • Rally Sweden returned to the championship after a one-year absence. In case of a lack of snow, the organisers moved the rally headquarters for the first time in WRC history.[18] It relocated from Torsby, Värmland northwards to Umeå in Västerbotten County.[19] The rally was initially scheduled to cover 303.74 km (188.7 mi) in nineteen special stages, but it was reduced to seventeen in a total of 264.81 km (164.5 mi) due to reindeer movements.[20]
  • Rally Italia Sardegna relocated its rally base back to Alghero following a one-off headquarter in Olbia for the 2021 event.[21]

Calendar changes

  • Rally New Zealand is set to return to the championship for the first time since 2012.[22] The country had also secured a spot in the calendar in 2020, but their bid to return to championship was taken down due to the cancellation of the event in response to the COVID-19 situation.[23]
  • For the third year in a row, Rally Japan takes the final spot in the original calendar. The previous two years saw the rally called off due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[24]
  • Rally Mexico has contracts to hold the WRC event in 2022 and 2023, but the rally was not included on the 2022 calendar.[25] A national event was held in the bid of a 2023 return.[26]
  • Rally Chile finds itself in a similar situation like Mexico when its contract with WRC Promoter GmbH is set to end in 2022. Chile had previously hosted the event in 2019.[27]
  • Rally GB was bidding for a 2022 return as the event was planned to hold in Northern Ireland, but the proposal was ultimately failed.[28]

Entrants

The following teams, drivers and co-drivers are expected to contest the 2022 World Championship under Rally1 regulations.[29][30]

Rally1 entries eligible to score manufacturer points
Manufacturer Entrant Car No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Ford United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Puma Rally1 16 France Adrien Fourmaux France Alexandre Coria 1–12
19 France Sébastien Loeb France Isabelle Galmiche 1, 4, 6, 10
42 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle 1–12
44 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith Sweden Jonas Andersson 2–3, 5, 7–12
Hyundai South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 N Rally1 2 Sweden Oliver Solberg United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson 1–3, 6–9, 11
6 Spain Dani Sordo Spain Cándido Carrera 4–5, 10, 12
8 Estonia Ott Tänak Estonia Martin Järveoja 1–12
11 Belgium Thierry Neuville Belgium Martijn Wydaeghe 1–12
Toyota Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota GR Yaris Rally1 1 France Sébastien Ogier France Benjamin Veillas 1, 4, 6, 11–12
4 Finland Esapekka Lappi Finland Janne Ferm 2–3, 5, 7–10
33 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin 1–12
69 Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen 1–12
Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT NG Toyota GR Yaris Rally1 18 Japan Takamoto Katsuta Republic of Ireland Aaron Johnston 1–12
Sources:[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42]

The below crews are not entered to score manufacturer points and are entered in Rally1 cars as privateers or under arrangement with the manufacturers.

Rally1 entries ineligible to score manufacturer points
Manufacturer Entrant Car No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Ford United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Puma Rally1 7 France Pierre-Louis Loubet France Vincent Landais 3–5, 7–8, 10, 12
9 Greece Jourdan Serderidis Belgium Frédéric Miclotte 6, 10, 12
37 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli Italy Simone Scattolin 2
Italy Lorenzo Granai 11
44 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith Sweden Jonas Andersson 1, 4, 6
68 Finland Jari Huttunen Finland Mikko Lukka 8
Sources:[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][40][41][42]

The below crews are entered to score team points in Rally1 cars as privateers or under arrangement with the manufacturers.

Rally1 entries eligible to score team points
Manufacturer Entrant Car No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Toyota Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT NG Toyota GR Yaris Rally1 18 Japan Takamoto Katsuta Republic of Ireland Aaron Johnston 1–12
Sources:[31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42]

Team changes

All three constructors are set for enter the championship with brand new cars:

  • M-Sport enters the championship with a new car based on the Ford Puma crossover, named Ford Puma Rally1.[43]
  • Hyundai switches the i20 Coupé plattform for the i20 N to race with.[44]
  • Toyota also replaces the third-gen Toyota Yaris for the GR Yaris.[45]

For the first three years life-cycle of Rally1 regulations, they will keep the Global Race Engine architecture (Inline 4-cylinder, 1.6 litre, direct injection turbo).[46]

Driver changes

Nine-time world champion Sébastien Loeb returns to the World Rally Championship with M-Sport.

M-Sport expanded their programme from two regular crews to three full-time entries.[47] The British team will be led by Craig Breen and Paul Nagle, who signed a two-year full-time contract.[48] Gus Greensmith remained with the team and would again contest a full campaign.[49] He will be co-driven by Jonas Andersson.[50] Adrien Fourmaux and Alexandre Coria were also retained with the team.[51][52] Nine-time World Champion Sébastien Loeb joined the team with new co-driver Isabelle Galmiche at the season's opener.[53] A fourth car will be also entered at the selected events, sharing-driven by the crew led by Lorenzo Bertelli and Pierre-Louis Loubet,[54] who is confirmed to be co-driven once again with Vincent Landais.[55] M-Sport long-time customer Jourdan Serderidis, who became the first privateer to buy a Rally1 car, will also share the fourth seat.[56]

Dani Sordo would retire from the sport at the end of the season.

Hyundai retained the crew of Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja and of Thierry Neuville and Martijn Wydaeghe as their two full-time competitors.[57] Oliver Solberg is set to step up into the Hyundai manufacturer team to share the third car with the crew lead by Dani Sordo.[58] Sordo announced he would retire from the sport after the season, ending his seventeen-year-long WRC career.[59] Andrea Adamo left his role as team principal.[60]

Sébastien Ogier (left) would only contest selected events, while his former co-driver Julien Ingrassia (right) retired from competition.

Toyota renewed contracts with the crew of Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin and of Kalle Rovanperä and Jonne Halttunen.[61] Eight-time World Champion Sébastien Ogier had also announced his intention to retire from the sport at the end of 2021.[62] Later he decided to only contest selected events of the 2022 season.[63] This restricts his chances of winning a ninth championship title.[64] Ogier had previously planned to retire at the end of the 2020 championship,[65] but the disruption brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic and the reduced number of events in 2020 prompted him to reconsider.[66] Benjamin Veillas is set to become Ogier's new co-driver following the retirement of Julien Ingrassia at the end of the 2021 championship.[67] Esapekka Lappi and Janne Ferm, who previously drove for Toyota between 2017 to 2018, would return to the team to share the third car with Ogier and Veillas.[68] Takamoto Katsuta would again contest a full campaign in a fourth car, this time under the new entrant Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Next Generation, with Aaron Johnston becoming his co-driver on a full-time basis.[69]

Regulation changes

Technical regulations

The championship is due to introduce a new set of technical regulations known as "Rally1" to replace the World Rally Car. The Rally1 regulations will place a greater emphasis on standardised parts than in previous years to make the sport more accessible.[70][71]

Rally1 will also introduce hybrid drivetrains to the sport for the first time.[72] This will take the form of an e-motor that produces 100 kW (134.1 hp) fitted to current 1.6 L turbocharged inline-4 engine and must be used to power the car when travelling around service parks and through built-up areas when driving between stages.[73] Drivers will be free to use the e-motor to offer additional power when competing in a stage, with the FIA dictating how much power can be used and how long a driver can deploy it for.[72] The hybrid system and the software governing its use will be standardised for three years as a way of keeping the costs of competing down.[74] The system will be provided by Compact Dynamics, a subsidiary of Formula E team Audi Sport ABT supplier Schaeffler.[75]

The championship will also introduce a standardised safety structure in a bid to improve safety standards. This will coincide with the homologation requirements being re-written to allow teams to enter a scaled chassis based on production cars rather than having to adapt a chassis to fit a roadgoing model.[72]

Sporting regulations

The eligibility requirements for crews entering events will be simplified and streamlined into a system called the "FIA Rally Pyramid".[70] The top tier of the sport is known as "Rally1". The second tier, "Rally2", will be for manufacturer teams and professional independent teams in the World Rally Championship-2. This will be followed by "Rally3" for privately entered and "gentlemen driver" crews competing in the World Rally Championship-3. "Rally4" and "Rally5" entries will not contest their own dedicated championship, but will be permitted to enter WRC rallies.

Following the creation of the World Rally Championship for Teams, a championship title that existed alongside the World Rally Championships for Drivers, Co-drivers and Manufacturers in the 2021 championship.[76] The 2022 championship will foresee its implementation. A team taking part in the Teams' championship will only be able to score points in a rally if a manufacturer competing with the same make of car has been entered into the event. Teams competing in the Teams' championship must contend a minimum of seven rallies, one of which must be outside Europe to be eligible for the championship. Under the new regulations, individual teams will compete against one another for the Teams' championship.[77]

Specific liaison sections in which Rally1 competitors must drive in full electric mode will be introduced into the championship.[78]

Season report

Opening rounds

New season, new rules, new cars, as the FIA World Rally Championship entered the Groups Rally era at Monte-Carlo.[79] Nine-time world champion Sébastien Loeb returned to the championship with M-Sport Ford WRT and was immediately in a battle for the victory with reigning world champion Sébastien Ogier.[80] It was not until the final stage of Saturday, when Ogier and Benjamin Veillas had a stunning run with slick tyres through the icy stage, that the time difference began to open up with Loeb and Isabelle Galmiche trailing by over twenty seconds.[81] However, a front-left puncture at the penultimate stage plus a penalty for a jump-start at the Power Stage lost Ogier and Veillas the lead, handing the rally victory to Loeb and Galmiche.[82] This was Loeb's eightieth rally victory and his first since the 2018 Rally Catalunya.[83] The victory also saw Loeb became the oldest driver to win a World Rally Championship event and Galmiche became the first female winner of a WRC fixture since 1997.[84] Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin were also in the fight for the win before they went off-road.[85] Hyundai's 2022 campaign seemed in deep trouble, not only because of a lack of speed in comparison to M-Sport and Toyota, but also for its poor reliability which saw a series of mechanical failures that forced the crews of Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja and of Oliver Solberg and Elliott Edmondson into retirements.[86] The third crew of Thierry Neuville and Martijn Wydaeghe overcame a damper issue, only to finish in sixth place, over eight minutes off the lead.[87]

The first leg of Rally Sweden saw five drivers leading in seven stages.[88] Road opener Kalle Rovanperä and Jonne Halttunen faced the challenge to sweep loose snow,[89] but they slotted into second overall by the end of Friday.[90] The Finnish crew soon overhauled overnight leader Neuville and Wydaeghe on the following day and held on to the lead to grab their third career victory.[91] Evans and Martin were running second while chasing down the rally leaders, but their effort was undone when they crashed on the final day and retired from the event.[92] Tänak and Järveoja also retired on Friday following a hybrid unit issue, but they rejoined the rally and won the Power Stage.[93] Craig Breen and Paul Nagle also had a weekend to forget as they beached their Puma on just the second stage of the rally.[94] They eventually finished the event in last position, but did collect one consolation point from the Power Stage.[95]

The Croatia Rally oversaw a series of punctures, with surprisingly low-grip conditions on wet tarmac making the rally eventful.[96] Championship leaders Rovanperä and Halttunen held a long-lived lead, which was over a minute at one point.[97] However, a compromised tyre choice plus a flat tyre saw the lead snatched by Tänak and Järveoja of Hyundai after the penultimate stage.[98] Rovanperä and Halttunen gave a final push at the Power Stage to overcome Tänak and Järveoja, and with it, a back-to-back victory and a commanding lead of twenty-nine points in the championships.[99] The final podium spot was covered by Neuville and Wydaeghe, who were given a total of two-minute time penalty for late check-in, speeding during road section.[100] The trouble-some season campaign of Adrien Fourmaux and Alexandre Coria is yet to start as they retired for the third rally in a row after crashing into the front garden of a neighbouring house.[101]

Mid-season gravel events

Heading into the gravel seasons, championship leaders Rovanperä and Halttunen would become the road opener, but that did not sacrifice their performance.[102] Their consistent pace at the opening day of Rally de Portugal saw them maximize the benefit from their rivals' troubles to acquire a better road position for Saturday.[103] This was further transferred to blistering pace, as they overhauled long-time rally leader teammates Evans and Martin by the end of Saturday and eventually won their third event of the season, making it a hat-trick, with another Power Stage win.[104] The victory also saw the Finnish crew increase their championship leads to a commanding advantage of forty-six points.[105] The returning Hyundai crew of Dani Sordo and Cándido Carrera put on a show with the Toyota crew of Takamoto Katsuta and Aaron Johnston, with the Hyundai pair coming out in front to round out of the final podium, edging out by just over two seconds.[106]

A couple of crews were battling for the lead as the Sardegna rally began, with Esapekka Lappi and Janne Ferm came out in the lead at the end of the first leg.[107] However, the Finnish crew crashed out at the opening stage of the following day, handing the rally lead to Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja.[108] The former world champions steadily increased their lead and eventually took the victory, ending their winning drought that lasted 462 days.[109] Moving to Kenya, teams and crews had to face challenging conditions.[110] While both M-Sport and Hyundai suffering, Toyota steered out of troubles and finished the event with a 1-2-3-4 finish, the first team to do so since Citroën Total WRT at the 2010 Rally Bulgaria.[111] Championship leaders Rovanperä and Halttunen sealed the victory, their fourth of the season.[112] The Finnish crew once again extended their lead in the championships, sixty-five points clear in the title race.[113] The unstoppable form of Rovanperä and Halttunen continued in Estonia, where the Finnish crew claimed their fifth win in six rallies.[114] Halfway through the season, their championship leads were stretching to a doughty eighty-three points.[115]

Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja driving a Hyundai i20 N Rally1 at the 2022 Rally Finland.

For the past five years, Toyota dominated the Rally Finland.[116] However, the 2022 event was spoiled by the Hyundai crew of Tänak and Järveoja, who led the event from the start to finish but the first stage to secure their second win of the season.[117] This helped the 2019 champions climbed up to second in the championships.[118] The victory was also the first ever triumph in Finland for the South Korean manufacturer.[119] Championship leaders Rovanperä and Halttunen were compromised by their road position on Friday, but they fought back to take the runner-up spot.[120] Teammates Lappi and Ferm rounded out of the podium despite of a roll during the penultimate stage.[121]

Closing rounds

The second pure-asphalt event was held in Ypres, where several infamous junction cuts caught out several top runners, including all three M-Sport crews, local heroes Neuville and Wydaeghe and championship leaders Rovanperä and Halttunen.[122] The tricky tarmac did not trap the Hyundai crew of Tänak and Järveoja, who fended off the Toyota pair of Evans and Martin to secure their third victory of the season.[123] Lappi and Ferm achieved back-to-back podium finish, with Solberg and Edmondson completed the rally in a career-high fourth place.[124] Hyundai carried on their form at Acropolis, finishing the rally with a first-ever 1-2-3 in team history, with Neuville and Wydaeghe took the victory.[125] Meanwhile, Rovanperä and Halttunen only took four points from the weekend, and therefore their championship leads were slashed to fifty-three points.[126]

Rovanperä and Halttunen turned the table around as they won the following event, which was enough for the Finn to secure their first world titles.[127] At the age of 22 years and 1 day, Rovanperä also became the younest World Rally Champion, breaking the previous record set by Colin McRae at the age of 27 years and 89 days in 1995.[128]

Results and standings

Season summary

Round Event Winning driver Winning co-driver Winning entrant Winning time Report Ref.
1 Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo France Sébastien Loeb France Isabelle Galmiche United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT 3:00:32.8 Report [129][130]
2 Sweden Rally Sweden Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:10:44.9 Report [131][132]
3 Croatia Croatia Rally Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:48:21.5 Report [133][134]
4 Portugal Rally de Portugal Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 3:44:19.2 Report [135][136]
5 Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Estonia Ott Tänak Estonia Martin Järveoja South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 3:10:59.1 Report [137][138]
6 Kenya Safari Rally Kenya Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 3:40:24.9 Report [139][140]
7 Estonia Rally Estonia Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:54:29.0 Report [141][142]
8 Finland Rally Finland Estonia Ott Tänak Estonia Martin Järveoja South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 2:24:04.6 Report [143][144]
9 Belgium Ypres Rally Belgium Estonia Ott Tänak Estonia Martin Järveoja South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 2:25:38.9 Report [145][146]
10 Greece Acropolis Rally Greece Belgium Thierry Neuville Belgium Martijn Wydaeghe South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 3:34:52.0 Report [147][148]
11 New Zealand Rally New Zealand Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2:48:01.4 Report [149][150]
12 Spain RACC Rally Catalunya de España Report
13 Japan Rally Japan Report

Scoring system

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers in each event. In the manufacturers' championship, teams are eligible to nominate three crews to score points, but these points are only awarded to the top two classified finishers representing a manufacturer and driving a 2022-specification Rally1 car. There are also five bonus points awarded to the winners of the Power Stage, four points for second place, three for third, two for fourth and one for fifth. Power Stage points are awarded in the drivers', co-drivers' and manufacturers' championships.[151][152]

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1

FIA World Rally Championship for Drivers

The driver who records a top-ten finish is taken into account for the championship regardless of the categories.

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
1 Finland Kalle Rovanperä 41 12 11 11 52 1 11 21 621 152 11 237
2 Estonia Ott Tänak Ret 201 22 64 1 Ret 3 14 14 21 32 173
3 Belgium Thierry Neuville 63 23 3 53 411 51 4 55 203 1 45 144
4 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans 212 Ret 53 25 403 2 22 43 22 Ret Ret 116
5 Japan Takamoto Katsuta 8 44 6 4 65 3 55 6 55 6 Ret 100
6 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen 3 365 44 8 2 6 30 322 63 53 19 77
7 Finland Esapekka Lappi 3 49 444 64 3 3 225 58
8 France Sébastien Ogier 25 51 43 23 55
9 Spain Dani Sordo 32 3 3 49
10 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith 5 5 15 19 7 144 Ret 7 19 294 Ret 36
11 France Sébastien Loeb 14 Ret 82 Ret 35
12 Sweden Oliver Solberg Ret 6 Ret 47 10 13 Ret 4 54 33
13 France Pierre-Louis Loubet 47 7 4 Ret Ret 4 30
14 Norway Andreas Mikkelsen 7 7 Ret Ret 83 7 13 25
15 Finland Emil Lindholm 32 95 10 8 7 14
16 France Yohan Rossel 13 7 10 18 8 Ret 11
17 Nikolay Gryazin[b] 10 Ret 10 28 8 WD DNS 10 8 11
18 Poland Kajetan Kajetanowicz 8 11 9 12 8 10
19 France Adrien Fourmaux Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret 135 7 18 Ret WD WD 9
20 New Zealand Hayden Paddon Ret 11 6 8
21 France Stéphane Lefebvre Ret 12 6 8
22 Greece Jourdan Serderidis 20 7 Ret 6
23 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli WD 7 6
24 Finland Jari Huttunen 9 28 10 11 9 Ret 5
25 Norway Ole Christian Veiby 8 4
26 United Kingdom Chris Ingram 14 11 12 11 9 Ret 2
27 Czech Republic Erik Cais 9 14 42 Ret 2
28 Finland Teemu Suninen Ret 38 9 DSQ 17 2
29 Spain Jan Solans 43 9 2
30 Cyprus Alexandros Tsouloftas 9 2
31 New Zealand Shane van Gisbergen 9 2
32 Estonia Egon Kaur 10 25 10 2
33 Norway Eyvind Brynildsen 10 1
34 Australia Harry Bates 10 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
Sources:[155][156]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Co-Drivers

The co-driver who records a top-ten finish is taken into account for the championship regardless of the categories.

Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
1 Finland Jonne Halttunen 41 12 11 11 52 1 11 21 621 152 11 237
2 Estonia Martin Järveoja Ret 201 22 64 1 Ret 3 14 14 21 32 173
3 Belgium Martijn Wydaeghe 63 23 3 53 411 51 4 55 203 1 45 144
4 United Kingdom Scott Martin 212 Ret 53 25 403 2 22 43 22 Ret Ret 116
5 Republic of Ireland Aaron Johnston 8 44 6 4 65 3 55 6 55 6 Ret 100
6 Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle 3 365 44 8 2 6 30 322 63 53 19 77
7 Finland Janne Ferm 3 49 444 64 3 3 225 58
8 France Benjamin Veillas 25 51 43 23 55
9 Spain Cándido Carrera 32 3 3 49
10 Sweden Jonas Andersson 5 5 15 19 7 144 Ret 7 19 294 Ret 36
11 France Isabelle Galmiche 14 Ret 82 Ret 35
12 United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson Ret 6 Ret 47 10 13 Ret 4 54 33
13 France Vincent Landais 47 7 4 Ret Ret 4 30
14 Norway Torstein Eriksen 7 7 Ret Ret 83 7 13 25
15 Finland Reeta Hämäläinen 32 95 10 8 7 14
16 France Valentin Sarreaud 7 10 18 8 Ret 11
17 Konstantin Aleksandrov[c] 10 Ret 10 28 8 WD DNS 10 8 11
18 Poland Maciej Szczepaniak 8 11 9 12 8 10
19 France Alexandre Coria Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret 135 7 18 Ret WD WD 9
20 New Zealand John Kennard Ret 11 6 8
21 France Andy Malfoy Ret 12 6 8
22 Belgium Frédéric Miclotte 20 7 Ret 6
23 Italy Lorenzo Granai 7 6
24 Finland Mikko Lukka 9 28 10 11 9 Ret 5
25 Norway Stig Rune Skjærmoen 8 4
26 United Kingdom Craig Drew 11 12 11 15 9 Ret 2
27 Czech Republic Petr Těšínský 9 14 42 Ret 2
28 United Kingdom Ross Whittock 14 9 2
29 Finland Mikko Markkula Ret 38 9 DSQ 17 2
30 Spain Rodrigo Sanjuan de Eusebio Ret 43 9 2
31 Australia Glen Weston 9 2
32 Estonia Silver Simm 10 25 10 2
33 Norway Roger Eilertsen 10 1
34 Australia John McCarthy 10 1
Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
Sources:[155][156]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers

Only the best two results of each manufacturer in the respective overall classification and Power Stage at each rally are taken into account for the championship.

Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
1 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2 12 11 11 42 1 11 21 22 52 11 455
41 3 53 25 73 23 22 3 3 65 23
NC2 Ret NC NC NC NC NC NC3 NC1 Ret Ret
2 South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 53 23 22 32 1 41 3 14 14 1 32 374
Ret 6 3 53 3 7 4 45 4 21 4
Ret NC1 Ret NC NC1 Ret NC Ret NC3 NC NC4
3 United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT 14 5 44 6 2 5 6 6 6 33 5 224
3 75 7 7 6 62 7 7 7 74 Ret
Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret NC5 Ret NC2 Ret Ret WD
4 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT NG 6 44 6 4 55 3 55 5 55 4 Ret 112
Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
CRO
Croatia
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
KEN
Kenya
EST
Estonia
FIN
Finland
BEL
Belgium
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
ESP
Spain
JPN
Japan
Points
Sources:[155][156]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

Notes

  1. ^ The Monte Carlo Rally is run on a tarmac and snow surface.
  2. ^ Nikolay Gryazin is a Russian national, but competes as an Authorised Neutral Athlete in accordance with recommendations made by the International Olympic Committee, after a decision by the FIA to ban all connections with Russia following the Russian invasion of Ukraine.[153][154]
  3. ^ Konstantin Aleksandrov is a Russian national, but competes as an Authorised Neutral Athlete in accordance with recommendations made by the International Olympic Committee, after a decision by the FIA to ban all connections with Russia following the Russian invasion of Ukraine.[153][154]

References

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External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2022 in World Rally Championship.
  • Official website (in English, French, and Spanish)
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2022 World Rally Championship
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Teams and drivers that are eligible to score manufacturer points
M-Sport Ford WRT
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  • 2017
  • 2018
Group R-GT (since 2015)
  • 2015
  • 2017
  • 2018
  • 2019
  • 2020
  • 2021
  • 2022
Production WRC (1987–2012)
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989
  • 1990
  • 1991
  • 1992
  • 1993
  • 1994
  • 1995
  • 1996
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 1999
  • 2000
  • 2001
  • 2002
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
Super 2000 WRC (2010–2012)
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
Junior WRC (since 2001)
2-L WRC (1993–1999)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Summer sports &
indoor sports
Winter sports
Cue & mind sports
Motor sports